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Tel Aviv University researchers are combatting cancer with a jasmine-based drug

 

Could a substance from the jasmine flower hold the key to an effective new therapy to treat cancer?

New research strongly suggests that a mix of preventive agents, such as those found in concentrated black raspberries, may more effectively inhibit cancer development than single agents aimed at shutting down a particular gene.

 

DukeUniversity chemists have patented an efficient technique for synthesizing a marine algae extract in sufficient quantities to now test its ability to inhibit the growth of cancerous cells while leaving normal cells unaffected.

 

Cancer surgeons today operate "blind" with no clear way of determining in real-time whether they have removed all of the diseased tissue, which is the key to successful surgery. Researchers in Massachusetts now report development and early clinical trials of a new imaging system that highlights cancerous tissue in the body so that surgeons can more easily see and remove diseased tissue with less damage to normal tissue near the tumor.

The pharmaceutical company Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) recently obtained approval in the American market for IXEMPRA, a semi-synthetic analog of epothilone B, for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer resistant or refractory to anthracyclines, taxanes, and capecitabine.

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